Cultural Doll Project

“Where we go in the future is determined by where we have been in the past.”  (Assia Khashoggi 2006)

For my culture doll project I choose to dress the doll something from the western province (Al-Hejaz) in Saudi Arabia, where I grew up, it is unique in its multi-cultural ethnic foundation primarily due to global immigration to Makkah and Medina, the two scared cities for Muslims where Holy Mosques are located. At the region costumes influenced by the cultural blend and produced a unique costume line that preserved the tribal foundation and emphasized the immigrant background. Studying the history of the costumes in the region identified the differences between Al-Hejaz outfit and other areas. Women in Al-Hejaz used to worn Zaboon, a long-sleeve, ankle length plain silk dress with another sleeveless ankle-length organza dress “thobe” worn on the top. However, in special occasions, thobe is often embroidered by floral design with gold-colored threads but the beneath long sleeve dress was usually remained plain or printed. In meeting with the Sharia law, women are obligated to cover their hair. Back then, women to use The Mihramah and the Mudawwara. The Mihramah was made of cotton and edges were decorated with crochet and covered the hair. The Mudawwara then placed on top of the Mihramah to cover the head. Both were handmade. On special occasions, usually the Mihramah and the Mudawwara were embroidered with gold-silk threads and diamond-studded brooches were placed on top. The yashmak was used as a veil to maintain a descent level of modesty. However, it was adopted by Hejazi women but originated during the Ottoman Emperor ruling period.

 

 

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